Eurocarers uses cookies to give you the best experience on our websites. By using this site you agree to our use of cookies as described in this Privacy Policy. Click here to remove this message.
Eurocarers RSS Feed

On the 10th November, the OECD published its new edition of Health at a Glance, which presents the most recent comparable data on the health status of populations and health system performance in OECD countries. 

Health at a Glance 2017 says that all OECD countries have seen life expectancy at birth increase by over 10 years since 1970 to reach an average of 80.6 years. Life expectancy at birth is highest in Spain and Switzerland (83 years each), and lowest in Latvia (74.6). New analysis in the report reveals that a 10% increase in health spending per capita in real terms would, on average, boost life expectancy by 3.5 months. However it is not just spending per se, but also how resources are used, that makes the difference in life expectancy. There is a large variation in the link between changes in health spending and in life expectancy: in the United States, for example, health spending has increased much more than in other countries since 1995, yet life expectancy gains have been smaller.  

The report confirms that families and friends are the most important source of care for people with long-term care needs in OECD countries and presents new data about the share of people aged 50 years and over who report providing care and assistance to family members and friends.
On average across OECD countries for which data is available, around 13% of people aged 50 and over report providing informal care at least weekly - but this figure is more than 20% in the Czech Republic and Belgium and less than 10% in Poland and Portugal. There is also variation in the intensity of the care provided. The lowest rates of daily care provision are found in Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark and the Netherlands - countries where the formal LTC sector is well-developed and public coverage is comprehensive.

The report, together with country notes and more information, is available at
http://www.oecd.org/health/health-systems/health-at-a-glance-19991312.htm
Country notes are available for Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States.